The Strange Library – Book Review

Title – The Strange Library

Author – Haruki Murakami

Original language – Japanese

English translator – Ted Goossen

Illustrator – Chip Kidd

Genre – Fantasy fiction

the-strange-library2-w

“Ever since I was little, my mother had told me, if you don’t know something, go to the library and look it up.”

Like most of us who have grown up on books, our unnamed narrator decides to visit the town library to issue some tomes. But strange things happen at the strange library. In spite of reaching almost near closing hours, the librarian insists that he read the books there itself, since those particular books are for reference only and cannot be issued. The narrator follows the librarian to the “reading room” – a long-winding walk through a labyrinth of corridors in the basement, where he is promptly locked up and told he can’t leave until he finishes reading all the books the librarian has given him.

The only other presences in the reading room are a talking sheep and a mysterious girl who bring him three meals a day. On questioning his fellow captives, the duo reveal nobody ever leaves the reading room. Once they finish reading the books he has given them, the librarian cuts off their heads and eats their brain, thereby consuming all their knowledge.

A quirky story with dark undertones, that takes you into the surreal world Murakami is known for. Past and present merge, as do reality and fantasy. Perfectly quipped by the mysterious girl who turns transparent at night, “Just because I don’t exist in the sheep man’s world, it doesn’t mean that I don’t exist at all“, Murakami gets the reader to think about how real reality really is, and which world is fantasy when the two collide.

As the narrator laments, “All I did was go to the library to borrow some books“, it is not just the characters sucked into the nightmarish library, but the reader who is also drawn into the peculiar world of Haruki Murakami. The book is printed in typewriter font, giving it an old world charm. Chip Kidd’s illustrations are vivid and brilliantly carry the story along, with bright colors contrasting the dark theme. This one is sure to have book lovers thinking strangely about libraries and suspiciously about librarians by the end of the book.

My rating – 3/5 for the story, 5/5 for the illustrations

Advertisements

Run The World #9 – MIRNA VALERIO

“Embrace what is difficult so that you may progress. Welcome what makes you frightened.”

Mirna Valerio is a marathoner, ultramarathoner, and trail runner. She ran the 50K NJ Ultra Trail Festival in 2013 and the 35-miles Georgia Jewel in 2014. 2015 was eventful with the 12-hour Midsummer Nights’ Ultra in June, Finger Lakes 50K in July, 35 miles at the Georgia Jewel in September, and 100K at the Javelin Hundred in October. She was back for the 50K Finger Lakes in 2016, and ran the Black Mountain Monster and NJ Running With The Devil – both 12-hour runs in the months of May and June respectively, along with the NYC Knickerbocker 60K in November 2017. 2018 saw her run the 50K Run Amok, and this year she ran the Shore2Shore in April and the Strawberry Fields Forever in June – both 50K ultramarathons. She has also done several 10Ks, 15-milers, half marathons, 25Ks and full marathons in the interim.

marathon

Skirt Sports 13er
Skirt Sports 13er
transrockies
Colorado Rockies – 6-Day Ultra

The 43-year old, 5-foot-7, 250-pound African-American dressed in a ball cap, fitness top, knee-length running tights, and training shoes often receives a double take, which she responds to with a smile and a wave. Despite racism and body-shaming, she continues challenging stereotypes and inspiring others to do the same. “I think that people are really having trouble grappling with the idea that fit comes in many forms and that people can still participate in athletics no matter what kind of body they have,” she says.

2013 Finger Lakes 50s 25K
Finger Lakes 25K, 2013
2010 North Face Half
North face Half Marathon, 2010

 

Mirna was raised in the Bushwick section of Brooklyn, bordering the Ridgewood neighborhood. Poverty, drugs, gangs, violence, absent fathers, single mothers, children locked away in apartments to avoid the danger of the streets, type 2 diabetes scourging the community – Valerio knew this world as she was growing up, but love and grit instilled strength and propelled her on an extraordinary trajectory.

Mirna was never a runner. In high school, she thought soccer involved too much running about, and decided to opt for hockey instead, assuming it was like golf – “walking through the field”. Realizing she couldn’t even manage the running drills before the actual game started, she decided to start running as “training for the warm-ups”. Running helped her not only in hockey but also lacrosse, a sport she loved, was good at, and wanted to get better at. “I started running to condition, to be able to be a better contributor to the team. It made me feel better. I fell in love with the act of running early in the morning.” While turning into an athlete, Valerio spontaneously blossomed as a singer. She taught herself to play piano by ear and sang gospel with her church choir. Excelling academically at the same time, Mirna demonstrated a particular gift for languages.

juilliard recital
Juilliard Choir Recital

She continued to run all the way through college, and recreationally through her twenties and thirties. In 2008, while driving to the school she taught at, she felt sharp pain in her chest. She was only thirty-three then, and her son who was with her had just turned five. Blood tests later revealed excessive arterial inflammation. The health scare prompted her to start exercising seriously. She started with 5Ks, subsequently graduating to 10Ks and 15-milers. Her blood pressure, resting heart rate, and cholesterol readings dropped down to healthy levels, and the inflammation in her arteries reduced. She started training for her first marathon, the Marine Corps Marathon, in 2011.

forested trail in georgia
Running through a forested trail in Georgia
copyrighted
Atop North Carolina’s Whiteside Mountain, National Geographic 2018

Shortly afterward she was drawn to trail running and ultras. She took to the solitude and challenge of the mountains, and also liked the comradeship and spirit of the trail-running community. “Part of a health journey, a fitness journey, a wellness journey — whatever you may call it — is finding what makes you happy. What about running makes you happy?” Reminiscing about a camping trip to the Catskill mountains at age eight, Mirna reveals how she fell in love with swimming in the lake, hiking, and just being outside all day; the sights and the smells all firmly etched in her memory. She loves being outside, whether hikes or camping trips. Long-distance running gives her an opportunity to be outside with a purpose. “Taking care of my body, exploring the limits — or my preconceived limits ― about what I thought I could do. The real appeal of it is pushing my body, pushing my mind, pushing my spirit.”

yoga-copyrighted
Yoga by a waterfall near Georgia’s Blackrock Lake, National Geographic 2018
Black Mountain Monster 12 Hr
Black Mountain Monster – 12 Hr Ultra, 2017
2013 Great Alaskan Marathon Cruise 5K
Great Alaskan Marathon Cruise, 2013

Mirna works at the Rabun Gap-Na-coochee School in the town of Rabun Gap, where she serves as Spanish teacher, choir director, and head coach of the cross-country team. She believes in uplifting the community, the value of discipline, and the pertinence of encouraging people to put their health first. Optimism and ambition pour over into every aspect of her life and splash onto the people around her as well. Her grasp of the complex relationship people have with fitness and her own existence as a plus-size woman who has completed several ultramarathons and marathons — along with her bubbly personality and sense of humor, all make her an inspiring role model.

friends
Warming up before a morning run

But she has her share of detractors as well and knows critics serve to criticize. “People say to me, ‘Anyone who runs as much as you do deserves to be skinny.’ ‘If you do all this running, why are you still so fat?’  People look at me and think, ‘Big as this girl is, how can she possibly enjoy her sport? She’s really just punishing herself.’ They don’t think I’m for real, that I’ve earned the right to call myself a runner. Some people don’t understand why I run in the woods. They think I’m gonna get kidnapped. Others have their own ideas about what I should or shouldn’t be doing, but I just do it anyway.”

tough mudder
Tough Mudder – an endurance event involving a series of obstacle races.

The link below is an indicator of all the races Mirna has participated in, from 5Ks to 100Ks.

https://www.athlinks.com/athletes/248654801/results

She runs about 25 miles a week if she’s not training for a race, 35 if she’s gearing up for an event, with the bulk of the mileage logged on a long weekend run. “Ms. Valerio is the most energetic teacher on campus,” says James Trammell, a senior at Rabun Gap, and co-captain of the cross-country team. Mirna is known to project an aura of inclusiveness in running: No matter who you are or what you look like, you have a place in this sport. Storyteller Jenny Nichols considers Mirna as the definition of a trailblazer. “She is redefining what a runner looks like and she’s doing it with style, grace and a huge smile. Mirna reinforces the fundamentals: Work out, be active, and eat a high-quality diet. Weight loss should be the by-product of a healthy life, not the goal. Writer John Brant is in awe of her all-encompassing pleasing personality.

book
A copy of her memoir

Mirna’s memoir, “A Beautiful Work in Progress“, was published in October 2017. “It’s not  about me being a fat athlete—I want to reach out to anybody who wants to feel good in their own skin, exercise, and enjoy things that they may not feel able or welcome to do,” she says.

book signing
At a book signing event

Mirna has never won any event, she is not the fastest or strongest-looking runner around, she doesn’t have a weight-loss story, and doesn’t have any disabilities. Why is she featured here? Because she is testimony to the fact that everybody can run. One doesn’t need to be on the podium, or lose weight, or run through medical conditions, or overcome visible obstacles, or have people constantly talking about them, to be considered inspiring. Even if no one praises you or writes or reads about you, you still run because it’s something you love to do. Everyone has their own journey and should proudly partake in it, irrespective of what others say.

blackrock lake georgia
Blackrock Lake in Georgia, National Geographic 2018

Mirna sets her running calendar at the beginning of each year, so that people can join her on her runs, as part of an initiative called “Wanna Run With Mirna?” This was her entire running calendar for 2018:

April 7-8 Throwing Bones Run on the Mountains to Sea Trail with Kenny Capps, Boone NC
April 14 – BAA 5K, Boston MA
April 16 – Boston Marathon, Boston MA
April 28 – The North Face Endurance Challenge Series 50K, Sterling VA
April 29 – The North Face Endurance Challenge Series 10K, Sterling VA
May 3-4 – Toughest South, Somewhere in TX
May 25 – Azores Trail Run 65K, Blue Island, Azores
June 1-3 – Skirt Sports Ambassador Retreat and 13er, Boulder CO
June 25-29 – City Kids Backpacking, Canoeing Jackson, WY
July 5-9 – Trail Running Adventures Retreat, Morganton NC
July 21-22 – Tough Mudder Long Island, NY
August 14-19 – Trans Rockies 6 Day
September 13-16 – REI Outessa, Waterville, NH
September 21-23 – Ragnar Adirondacks, Lake Placid, NY
September 27 -October 1 -Hiking Retreat in UT

Mirna realizes that whatever might be your journey – as a runner, a woman, a mother, or whoever one may be – somebody might be looking at you or looking at the things that you do and say, “Oh wow, I didn’t know that we could go and run for six days in the Colorado Rockies. Maybe I could try to do 5K.” We are all not on the same page, we don’t all have the same capabilities or the same financial ability to do things. But “things are possible – like going for a walk“. Mirna’s sixty-year old mom goes backpacking with her. What are her own sources of inspiration? You’re not always going to be motivated. And that’s the reality, you cannot live by motivation. Because you’re not always going to be inspired. You have to be disciplined.”

family
Mirna with her son and husband
magazine
On the cover of Women’s Running

 

Sources:

~www.huffingtonpost.in

~www.runnersworld.com

~www.national geographic.com

~www.themirnivator.com

Run The World #5 – Moire O’Sullivan

Moire O’Sullivan is a mountain runner and adventure racer. The Irish runner is a regular podium finisher at adventure races all around Ireland, such as Quest Killarney, Quest Glendalough, Dingle Adventure Race, Gaelforce West, and Westport Sea2Summit. She was the first person to complete the Wicklow Round within twenty-four hours, an endurance run spanning a hundred kilometres over twenty-six of Ireland’s remotest mountain peaks. Adventure Racing (or Expedition Racing) is a multi-disciplinary sport involving running, cycling and kayaking, navigated over an unmarked wilderness course, spanning anywhere between hours to weeks in length. Moire not only competes and wins, but beats the men along the way.

mosullivan_questglendalough01
Running through the forests in the Wicklow Mountains during the Quest Glendalough Adventure Race 2017.

Moire O’Sullivan was born in 1976 in Derry. As a child, she was interested in science. She played netball until the age of eighteen, when she quit to focus on the viola, and consequently played in the Ulster Youth Orchestra. She has a BSc in Chemistry and an MA in Administration and Management. After university, she worked for missionaries in Kenya. Having spent seven years in Africa, she returned to Ireland and took up mountain running.

In July 2008, Moire made a solo attempt on the Wicklow Round. After twenty one and a half hours she collapsed, two summits from the end. Battered and bruised, yet undeterred, she returned a year later to become the first person ever to complete the Round in less than twenty four hours. Her passion for mountain running that took her from the heights of some of Ireland’s most impressive mountains to the depths of her own human limitations, is chronicled in the 2011 book “Mud, Sweat, and Tears”.

In 2018, she completed the Denis Rankin Round, a challenge to summit all the peaks in the Mourne Mountains over 400m in height within a 24 hour period. She also won Ireland’s National Adventure Racing Series in 2014, 2016 and 2017.

4.-QuestKillarney2016_Bike
Quest Killarney 2016
Mourne_Mountains_BARF_2017-768x576
Mourne Mountains 2017

Moire makes it seem like a breeze, but the years 2014 and 2016 are particularly remarkable because she not only had two children in 2013 and 2015, but also won the National Adventure Race series both times. In fact, Moire had even raced the twenty-four hour Northern Ireland’s Sperrin Mountains when she had not yet discovered she was pregnant at the time. Olympic medallist Sonia O’Sullivan credits Moire for her insights into the challenges of bringing children into the world while continuing to live the life of a top level athlete – a true inspiration for mums who run. Champion hill racer Jasmin Paris refers to Moire’s 2014 and 2016 feats as a winning journey through motherhood and mountains. Surprisingly, it was motherhood that got the formerly mountain runner into adventure racing.

1601189_10152662286607860_739497652000849373_n
Running down Strickeen Mountain at Killarney 2014

I was pregnant with my first child, and feeling tired and fat. I was so depressed that I couldn’t race in my current condition that I started to flick through my phone to see what my mountain running friends were up to. They were biking through the Gap of Dunloe, kayaking around Muckross Lake, running up and down Mangerton Mountain. That’s what I wanted to do!

 

Coming from a running background, Moire learned how to ride a bike outdoors, how to use indoor rollers; hiring a coach to train her for this new discipline while also taking her pregnancy into account. On apprehensions of a first time mum about how fellow athletes would feel having a pregnant woman in their midst, Moire shares “Post my third trimester, I decided to join a local cycling club. Scared they might prevent me from riding, I concealed my pregnancy from them. It was only when my belly started to bulge from beneath my biking jacket that I had to eventually come clean“. Her first tryst with adventure racing was the Killarney Adventure Race, the same videos and pictures she had seen of her friends.

10626517_853624541327924_2012045129799049300_n
Biking leg of Killarney 2014

On a  mothers’s bond with her child, Moire reveals, “During the fifth month, I competed in an adventure race that involved biking, mountain running and kayaking across the Inishowen Peninsula, in North-West Ireland.  Running off the summit of Slieve Snacht, half-way through the course, I got the mother of all stitches. I knew there was nothing I could do except descend the mountain and seek emergency medical help. When I reached the mountain’s base, the pain had somehow dissipated, so I ran straight past the medics. I continued on and completed the course after five hours of racing. It was only after crossing the finish line that my baby delivered the mother of all kicks. It was his way of communicating that he had no further interest in racing“.

Beach-with-Aran-Aug-2013-e1542036323532
With newborn Aran

When her elder son Aran was four months old, Moire entered the Sea2Summit adventure race that involved running and biking around a remote mountainous area in the west of Ireland, carting her husband and baby down to Westport, with a car full of baby gear. She finished the race in third place. When Aran was twelve months old, she ran the 66 km Gaelforce West.

6.-Westport-Sea2Summit-Adventure-Race
Westport Sea2Summit

The 2018 book “Bump, Bike & Baby” chronicles her personal journey of these two years – learning about motherhood, and bringing up two children while simultaneously training for, and subsequently winning a series of races. Moire shares an honest account of her apprehensions of becoming pregnant while at the top of her sport, her experiences as a new mom in 2013, the quest to find other mum-athletes who could teach her a thing or two, getting back to training with a toddler, and repeating it all over again in 2015, striking a balance between her children and the sport she loves. As Moire describes it – a journey from carefree mountain runner to responsible mother of two, to unbeatable athlete.

1.-Quest-Glendalough-Podium-2016-1-Copy-Copy
Quest Glendalough 2016 podium, with 9-month old Cahal

“You can get back to racing and training. It’s a struggle, but you can.”

Moire cites her inspiration as track cyclist Susie Mitchell, who trained through her own pregnancy, and four months after giving birth won a World Masters track title. She also credits her coaches who guided her appropriately through walking and swimming during the latter months of pregnancy, with proper race training post delivery. “No one can fully prepare you for the seismic shift your life takes once you have a baby. You are totally responsible for making sure they are safe, clean, and fed. Before children, I could go for a day-long run in the mountains if I wanted to. With a baby around, one that I was breastfeeding exclusively, military precision timing was necessary for me to leave the house for even an hour.” Moire stresses on the importance of using time efficiently. “Every training session had a specific focus; whether it was strength and conditioning, or power sessions on the bike, or time spent rowing in the gym“.

Irish marathoner Padraig O’Connor describes Moire as a phenomenal athlete who passes friendly words of advice or encouragement to fellow runners, before she flies off, leaving mere mortals in her dust. What pushes an athlete at the peak of their game? What frightens them? “The fact that I was abandoning my baby to go and train continually plagued me with guilt. How could I be so selfish, taking time out for myself? But returning from these training sessions, I knew it was the right thing to do. Not only was I getting my body back into shape, but training was also reminding me who I was as a person, before I took on this additional role as a mother“. Whether one is involved in sports or not, races competitively or recreationally, Moire’s journey is inspiring. We all belong to different tribes, but Moire teaches us how to strike a balance with different identities, combining life, family and sport.

47b24fbb-863c-4898-a2f5-cbcb15af7c8f
Bikes and babies

“I love it when new mothers say, ‘you helped me to think through how to be me.’”

Moire previously worked for international aid agencies throughout Africa and South-East Asia. Her job took her around the world, enabling her to run in Australia, Bali, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Hong Kong, Kenya, Laos, Myanmar / Burma, Nepal, New Zealand, Spain, Singapore, South Korea, Tanzania, Thailand, USA, and Vietnam. She had tried to run in Afghanistan, but was forbidden by security staff. She now lives in Rostrevor, Northern Ireland, at the foot of the Mourne Mountains, and runs her own company “Happy out Adventures“, that aims to bring people to experience and enjoy trails and mountain slopes, while teaching them how to travel outdoors and respect nature.

Her hope is that her journey encourages women to keep fit – before, during, and after kids. “If you’re lacking inspiration, go for a run!”

img_7889

 

Sources:

~www.moireosullivan.com

~www.lessonsinbadassery.com

~www.gaelforceevents.com

~www.questadventureseries.com

Run The World #4 – Dave Heeley

For the fourth in our international runner series, we venture into ultrarunning territory.

In April 2015, British runner Dave Heeley became the first blind athlete to complete the 250 km (156 mile) Marathon des Sables – a course across the Sahara desert known as the “toughest footrace on earth”, equivalent to running six regular full marathons back-to-back. The then 57-year old father of three, known in running circles as “Blind Dave“, completed the six-day challenge running through sand dunes, rocks and dried rivers, contending with temperatures rising up to 50°C during the day and below freezing at night, with all his provisions on his back.

Marathon-Des-sables-2-e1458213494100
Marathon des Sables

“Blindness has encouraged me to see another way.”

Dave was running to raise funds for the Albion Foundation, which uses sport to strengthen the local community, helping children and adults with disabilities and learning difficulties to both excel in sport and transit from education to work . He had two guides on the route – Rosemary Rhodes and Tony Ellis. In an interview with British Blind Sport, Heeley was quoted as saying, “Running makes you a bigger part of the community. You never know what it might bring and where it might take you.

_g0f0966
Fundraising for the Albion Foundation

Dave Heeley was born on 24th November 1957. At age ten, he was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa – a genetic, degenerative eye condition that causes breakdown and loss of cells in the retina. Beginning with decreased vision at night and in low light, loss of peripheral/tunnel vision, and progressing to total blindness, Heeley lost his vision completely in his twenties. His dream of joining the army shattered, young Dave knew he was going blind, and that his options were to stay negative or positive. He opted for the latter. “Am I going to sit here for the next fifty years waiting for that tree to disappear? No!” He spent years developing skills in Braille, computers, carpentry, and even now loves designing things and building furniture. He used a walking stick initially, until his first guide dog Peter changed his life. The four-legged friend gave him confidence, mobility and adventure.

 

Dave-Heeley (1)

Dave-Heeley

The monumental feat at Marathon des Sables wasn’t Heeley’s first dip into the record books. In 2008, Dave became the first blind man to complete the Seven Magnificent Marathons challengerunning 7 marathons on 7 continents in 7 days. His route took him from Port Stanley in the Falkland Isands (Antarctica) to Santiago, Chile (South America), Los Angeles, USA (North America), Sydney (Australia), Dubai (Asia), Nairobi, Kenya (Africa), and ultimately finishing with the London Marathon (Europe). He was 50 at the time. 777 was undertaken to raise awareness for guide dogs for the blind. As Dave described the feat later, ” 7 days and 168 hours, of which 20 hours I slept and approximately 35 hours I ran; the rest was spent travelling. Travelling over 35,000 miles in the air, passing through some 34 different time zones,  running for 183.4 miles in temperatures ranging from -2 to 39°C“. His guide runner Mac was the third sighted person along side Mike Stroud and Sir Ranulph Fiennes to have achieved this superhuman challenge.

a1-falklands-start1
777- start at the Falkland Islands
777_Dubai_Finish_trans_NvBQzQNjv4BqZgEkZX3M936N5BQK4Va8RWtT0gK_6EfZT336f62EI5U
777 – completing one of the legs at Dubai
Blind-Dave-Heeley-completes-his-777-challenge-at-the-2008-London-Marathon
777 – ending the challenge at the London Marathon

 

“Life is not about what you can’t do, but what you can do.”

In 2011, Dave Heeley ran ten marathons in ten days, travelling from John O’Groats to Land’s End, cycling between each stage. Called “Top2Toe“, the challenge aided the Macmillan Cancer Support in their centenary year.

 

w4c-4
Preparing for a 100 km cycling event, “Wheels For Change”, with tandem partner and guide Steve Dugmore

In 2016, he learnt swimming because he wanted to undertake “Escape from Alcatraz” – considered the toughest triathlon in the world. At 7.30 am on the morning of the 12th June, Dave along with his guide Tony leapt off the San Francisco Belle moored briefly alongside Alcatraz prison, into the cold, rough shark infested waters of San Francisco Bay, 58 minutes later hitting the beach, transferred onto the tandem and the San Fran hills taking 1 hour 18 minutes, finally donning the trainers hitting the cliffs and sand, taking 1 hour 24 minutes, crossing the finish line. Finally escaping from Alcatraz in 4 hours 14 minutes and 11 seconds, with smiles of relief!

CjSd220XAAEjodk
Prepped for Alcatraz with his guide Tony
Alcatraz swim
Swimming leg of the Alcatraz Triathlon – with a model shark named after his guide dog Seamus

His sporting endeavors are sponsored by Pertemps, UK, who also donate to his charity which works in partnership with the West Bromwich Albion Football Club, and £1000 are donated for every Great Run he completes. In 2017, since it was his 60th year, he took on the Great Run Series‘ entire world events calendar – starting in Edinburgh and finishing in Ethiopia, all in aid of the Albion Foundation. The series included two full marathons, six half marathons, two 10 mile events, ten 10 ks, one 5 mile race, and four 5 ks. In October the same year, he ran two races on the same day – the Birmingham International Marathon and the Great Birminghim Run. In May 2019, Dave took part in the Velo Birmingham & Midlands 100 mile bike ride, and also the 100 km Wheels For Change cycling event – to help raise funds for UNICEF along with his tandem cycling partner Steve Dugmore. In June this year he ran the Comrades Ultramarathon in South Africa.

wanted-poster
An innovative fund raiser for the “7inSeven” – a series of 7 cycling events across the UK

“I sat down the other day and calculated that, including training, I’ve run about 58,000 miles in my lifetime.”

Dave is always up for challenges. He has gone skiing, water skiing, horse riding, motorcycling, abseiling, but he enjoys nothing more than running! His book “From Light to Dark” was published in February 2016. Veteran record-breaking English explorer Sir Ranulph Fiennes has foreworded the inspirational tale of triumph over adversity.

6ZLGBBBXSNFIRLUB5D27G2X6MU
With copies of his book

 

MV5BZjVlOTkxZDEtZWEyMi00NDk2LWFmNjItNDRlMTMyOGZmNzI2XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMjMwMDc3Mzc@._V1_QL50_SY1000_CR0,0,707,1000_AL_
7 Days – a short film based on the life of Dave Heeley, released in February this year.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Guide dog Seamus looks appreciatively at a bus named in Dave’s honor.
dr-blind-dave
Dr. Dave Heeley, after receiving an honorary doctorate from the University of Wolverhampton

Sources:

~www.blinddaveheeley.co.uk

~www.pertemps.co.uk

~www.sundaypost.com

~In The Running – Phil Hewitt

Run The World #3 – Sister Madonna Buder

“I love the feeling I get when I whizz past people younger than me who say, ‘I want to be like you when I get to your age’.”

Third in our series of international runners, as a line-up to the ninth anniversary of my running group here, is Sister Madonna BuderThe Iron Nun!

Sister Buder is the current world record holder for the oldest person to ever finish an Ironman Triathlon. Born on 24th July 1930, the 88 year old is no ordinary nun, and is known in the athletics community as the Iron Nun. The Ironman triathlon consists of a 3.2 km (2.4mile) swim, 180 km (112 mile) bike ride, and a 42.2 km (26.2 mile) run. Sister Buder has competed in 340 triathlons, out of which 45 have been Ironmans.

wgfcx2hqlaq11

“I feel like God’s puppet: First I am down,then he pulls me up with strings, and then he pulls the strings to put me hither, dither and yon.”

Sister Buder was 14 when she decided to become a nun. As a child, she was more interested in equestrian events, and even won national championships at the age of 16. She entered the Sisters of the Good Shepherd convent in St. Louis, Missouri when she was 23, where she remained until 1990 when she went to serve with the Sisters for Christian Community in Spokane, Washington.

horse
As a young equestrian enthusiast, before she joined the convent.
habit
At age 23, with the Sisters of the Good Shepherd

After over two decades as “Sister Madonna”, she found her second calling – Running! She started running at the age of 45, as a means to keep the mind, body and spirit healthy. Unsure of the reaction “racing nuns” would receive, she confided her doubts to the bishop, who replied, “Sister, I wish my priests would do what you’re doing!” The simple and direct response inspired her to join running clubs, with serious training and racing beginning at age 48, where she ran for the cause of Multiple Sclerosis.

iron-nun-madonna-buder-2

Her thoughts about triathlons at the time? She found swimming claustrophobic, and couldn’t sit on a bike saddle for so long. But she would try. The steely nun completed her first triathlon at the age of 52 at Banbridge, Ireland in 1982, and her first Ironman at age 55. Her sense of accomplishment was met with a simple, “I was content.” Bruder earned the title “Iron Nun” when she became the oldest woman ever to complete the Hawaii Ironman in 2005 at the age of 75. Her current world record for the oldest woman to ever finish an Ironman triathlon was set at the age of 82 at the Subaru Ironman Canada on 26th August 2012. This feat broke the record of 81-year old Lew Hollander’s 16:45:55 set at Ironman Kona in 2011, causing sister Buder to be the oldest person ever (male or female) to complete an Ironman in the 80+ category with 16:32:00. The Ironman organization has had to add new age brackets as the sister gets older and breezes through every age group. She has opened up five age groups through her athletics career, thereby enabling older folks to compete as well.  In 2014, Sister Buder was inducted into the USA Triathlon Hall of Fame.

s3-news-tmp-109131-nikeunlimitedyouth--2x1--940
Featured in a Nike ad

Inevitably, Sister Buder acknowledges the hand of a higher authority in her achievements. She was approaching the 37th km (21st mile) of the Boston Marathon in 2013 when the bombers struck, and she was escorted away from the scene. Running is her favorite part of triathlons, and she can’t wait to get to the final leg. Describing her passion for her favorite sport, Sister Buder says, “I don’t know what runner’s high is. I know what the lows are if I don’t run. When I’m out of bed, the first thing I do is run to mass. Literally!”

IMG-20130810-WA0008
The bike portion of the Kona World Championship, 11th October 2014

The Iron Nun’s training?

“I train religiously”, is how she describes her training. “I know that God has given me this gift. And I have to make the most of the gift. If I didn’t make the most of it, it would be an affront to the gift giver.” She runs to church or every day if the weather permits. She bikes 40 miles to swim in a lake near her house, and goes for longer runs on weekends. She also runs to the jail to talk to inmates and read scriptures to them. Most of her training is solo, since people her age are on grandparent duty. Otherwise, her training buddies are decades younger than her.

1900181

Smartphones and computers and the internet are big annoyances to Sister Buder. “What’s all the fuss about?”, she asks. “I’m just a little old lady doing her thing.” And what did she do when she turned 88 last year? Competed in St. Anthony’s Triathlon at St. Petersburg. Her favorite part of competing? “The spirit of camaraderie. I know these people. They are my extended family.” How do her fellow-runners perceive a nun running amidst them? “They think I’ll pray for good weather or something.” Interviews annoy her. But then she prays and meditates and runs 2 miles and calms down. She considers her dual role as sister and athlete complimentary to one another – they both require discipline and are character-builders. Religion aside, she feels if everyone adopted such sporting endeavors and focused on practice, the world would be much better off.

9d0e67b1-f3e4-474a-b527-72f3067eca73_1.f973552a217da25e8c15b4fc69d5a7b7
Cover image of her book

On 5th October 2010, Sister Buder released her autobiography “The Grace to Race“, sharing the wisdom and inspiration of the Iron Nun. Reviews have described it as the courageous story of a woman who broke with convention, followed her heart, and found her higher mission.

Madonna Buder by Ari Nordhagen (1000x714)
The Iron Nun – Sister Madonna Buder

 

Sources:

~www.globalsistersreport.org

~www.thenational.ae

~www.triathloninspires.com

~www.tampabay.com

~In The Running – Phil Hewitt

Run The World #2 – Achim Aretz

Put your best foot backwards!

When Achim Aretz runs, you can’t follow him. At a pace where many can’t even move forward, Achim’s ingenuity has caused him to run himself  into the record books by completing the world’s fastest backwards half-marathon and full marathon.

On 31st October 2010, Achim Aretz broke the six year old world record set by Chinese Xu Zhenjun over the marathon distance in reverse by 58 seconds, and his new record still holds at 3:42:41, set at the Frankfurt Marathon. Aretz reveals how Kenyan Wilson Kipsang couldn’t believe that a 3:40 hr marathoner could be in the record books. At the Hochwald Middle Rhine Marathon in Koblenz on 28th May 2011, Aretz broke his own previous record in the half marathon retro distance set in 2009, by completing in 1:35:49.

Achim Aretz was born on March 13, 1984 in Essen, Germany. He studied Geosciences in Münster and obtained a doctorate in Darmstadt from the Technical University. How does a passionate runner suddenly decide to run the other way round? The reason is “a crazy idea”. Aretz chanced on retro-running when he woke up with a hangover. To shake it off, he went for a run with a friend. Aretz was so slow that his friend started running backwards to while away the time. Aretz joined in for fun, and found he preferred it. He later discovered from the social network “Studivz“, that there really is an international retro-running scene, and decided to henceforth compete as a retro-runner. He says the attraction was the mental challenge, and the fact that he was developing different muscles compared to runners who run forward. His runs are both solo as well as with friends. “When I am running alone, I have to look back maybe every ten meters. When I am running together with friends, they tell me what lies behind me.”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
En route at the Frankfurt Marathon
pressekonferenzffmmarathon
At a press conference after the Frankfurt Marathon, where he set the current world record for fastest reverse full marathon.
ericsson
At the Hochwald Middle Rhine Marathon, where the current world record for fastest reverse half marathon was set.

 

Medical specialists have confirmed that running backwards allows better recovery from certain knee and ankle injuries. Retro-running has been found to burn more calories with twenty percent less effort than running forward. Performance analyst Mitchell Phillips has underlined the benefits walking or running backwards brings – it is a great way to cool down, and also improves balance and increases neuromuscular efficiency. Phillips describes it as the perfect remedy to cure the imbalances between anterior and posterior chain muscle groups (like the hamstrings and quadriceps, for instance). In his book “Backwards Running“, Robert K. Stevenson describes retro-running as a fantastic activity for physical conditioning and training. It is considered healthy to occasionally tear the body out of everyday movements and break out of set habits. Not only other muscle groups, but also senses such as hearing are strengthened.

Running backwards has a meditative character“, says Aretz. “I perceive the environment differently when I walk backwards.” He does not see what lies ahead, but what he has already done. His ambition is not to win medals, and the main thing in competitions around the world is an opportunity to meet old acquaintances.

frankfurtinder
With his friend Gregor Schlüter and centenarian marathoner Fauja Singh at the 29th Frankfurt Marathon

The 35-year old geologist runs up to 80 kilometers a week backwards. He explains how reverse runners start with the forefoot, thereby avoiding the typical rolling over the heel motion that occurs while moving forward. Beginners struggle with sore muscles at the beginning (as in any other sport), and many with knee problems have found it to be a beneficial alternative for relieving pressure on the knees. Several other sportspersons have also incorporated and benefited from retro-running, including boxer Gene Tunney and wrestlers William Muldoon and Ed Schultz.

Achim Aretz shares some tips in the Westdeutsche Allgemeine Zeitung for those who want to start running backwards:

Started very slowly and for a short time. It’s best to use a flat surface, such as a tartan/synthetic track. One needs to get used to going into the unknown. Bumpy terrains are not the best places to start to train. Not seeing the track is an unfamiliar situation for the mind and there is always the fear of falling. He cites the most difficult obstacles being dogs who can’t figure out what he’s doing. Training with a partner can be very useful for beginners because the partner can give instructions and set the direction. It helps when the retro-runner does not have to turn his head constantly – which can cause sore neck muscles. In addition, the mind is trained differently, because when one goes forwards and the other backwards, “right” then suddenly becomes “left” and vice versa.

In an interview with Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Aretz reveals how Germany is a strong reverse running nation – they have many record holders up to the 5000 meters distance, and Aretz himself hold the records for the half marathon and full marathon distances. Achim Aretz has also authored a book titled “Faszination Marathon Andersherum“, where he talks about his journey as a retro-runner, shares scientific insights into the physical differences between running forward and backward, the challenges to the brain to break out of set patterns, and how changed perceptions bring new ideas and insights into running as well as to life.

Coverbildhomepage5
Achim Aretz’s book on backward running, originally written in German.

 

Sources:

~www.welt.de

~www.faz.net

~www.waz.de

~www.achim-aretz.de

~www.baukasten-dateien.de

~In The Running – Phil Hewitt

Run The World #1 – Violet Piercy

Our running group here will be celebrating its ninth anniversary next month. Over the last nine years since its inception, there has been a tradition of a city-wide coming together of all distance runners, to run a 21 km (13 miles) stretch on the city roads every first Sunday of every month. As a result, the anniversary run is going to be held on the seventh of July this year. As a line up to the celebrations, I will be writing a series of articles, featuring international distance runners.

First up is Violet Piercy, considered the pioneer of women’s running.

Violet Piercy is recognized by the International Association of Athletics Federation as having set the first women’s world’s best in the marathon distance. Now-a-days, women of all shapes and sizes run along the streets and compete in marathons around the world. But there was a time when running was considered injurious to women’s health, and one of the rules of the Women’s Amateur Athletic Association (WAAA) was that no race should exceed 1000 meters, since any distance over a kilometer would be a “strain” and adversely affect child-bearing ability. Violet Percy blithely broke the rules of the WAAA and even broadcast an account of it on the BBC.

violet

In 1926, probably in response to the acclaim received by American Gertrude Ederle, the first woman to swim the English Channel, Violet ran from Windsor to London, thereby becoming the first Englishwoman to attempt a marathon and the first to be officially timed when she ran 3:40:22 on 3rd October 1926 on the Polytechnic Marathon course. She started at 4:27 pm, and was slowed down by suburban traffic outside Battersea Town Hall, till she finished at 8 pm. This time stood as a world record for the next 37 years, until American Merry Lepper ran 3:37:07 in California’s Western Hemisphere Marathon on 16th December 1963. Englishwoman Paula Radcliffe currently holds the world record for the fastest women’s marathon, with a time of 2:15:25 set in London in 2003.

Piercy fell into obscurity over the years, and athletics historian Peter Lovesey conducted a series of investigations into her athletics career. As we inch towards 2020, almost a century has passed since Violet Piercy ran the marathon in the 1920s, when the rules barred any woman from running more than two laps. Research by various historians shows that Violet ran five marathons between 1926 and 1936, in a pair of walking shoes with cross straps and heels. Piercy’s white jersey, black shorts and dance-like shoes serve as a priceless insight into a runner from a different era.

22Violet-Piercy
An iconic picture of  Violet Piercy accompanied by three cyclists and followed by a car during a race in 1927.

Violet Stewart Louisa Piercy was born in Croydon, Surrey on 24th December 1889. She was 36 at the time of her first distance run, and her athletics career carried on till the age of 46. Over a period of 12 years and between two world wars, Piercy was widely regarded as an eccentric and feisty runner, who had a flair for slapping court cases against people who upset her. Rules were “tosh and piffle” to Violet, who ran solo marathons to prove to the world that women could be good at sport and endurance events. She referred to the sport as being based on rhythm, co-ordinated movements and clean living.

Reactions to her feats at the time?

The Westminister Gazette wrote: “It must be hoped that no other girl will be so foolish as to imitate her.”

Piercy’s response: “I am the only long-distance woman runner in this country, and people rather shout at me about it. I really don’t see why they should. Running is about the healthiest form of exercise a woman can have.” Piercy worked as a doctor’s secretary and encouraged others to take up distance running, but no one took up the challenge in her lifetime, and her runs were always solo.

22Violet-Piercy-long-distance champion
A news clipping of Piercy in 1934 from the Clapham Society

The second world war affected her stream of marathons, and there is no trail of hers since the 1950s. She is known to have passed away in a London hospital in April 1972, having suffered from brain hemorrhage, hypertension and chronic kidney-related infection. Violet Piercy had languished in obscurity for about 70 years, but the British Pathe archives, the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, and Track Stats magazine have been instrumental in finally securing for her the recognition she deserves.

The link below is from the British Pathe website, and is a copyrighted video of Violet Piercy.

https://www.britishpathe.com/video/camera-interviews-the-runner/query/Violet

 

Sources:

~www.claphamsociety.com

~www.britishpathe.com

~www.clappedoutrunner.com

~In The Running – Phil Hewitt

For A Rainy Afternoon – Book Review

Title – For A Rainy Afternoon

Author – R J Scott

Genre – LGBTQ fiction, novella

64538050_10158612336759937_4545009962576773120_n

“I was never happier than with my nose in a book, tea next to me, and maybe a couple of chocolate chip cookies on a plate. Add in rain against the window and I was in heaven.”

Robbie works at the post office in an idyllic English village. The post office houses a café and a reading area, where people meet to discuss and exchange books, while sipping tea and relishing cakes. An elderly lady, Maggie, who loved books and reading and baking, and had bought the building that houses the post office and café, passes away, bequeathing the entire property to Robbie, while the rest of her estate has been willed to Jason, an American writer. As far as the villagers know, Maggie never had any family and lived her whole life alone in the village.

At the center of the story is a collection of limited edition books by Monroe Kitchener that Maggie has addressed to Robbie. Over repeated attempts to recreate Maggie’s famed applesauce cake, Robbie tries to figure out why Maggie left her property to him. What connection does she have with Monroe Kitchener? And who is the American now living in her cottage? Are all these questions somehow inextricably linked to Maggie’s past that the villagers know nothing of? As the secret ingredients to the applesauce cake slowly reveal themselves, an ephemeral story from Maggie’s past also starts unravelling from over seven decades ago.

A pleasant story to read on a rainy day, with tea and baked treats – just like Maggie would have enjoyed it. The writing however doesn’t match up to the story and is a bit of a letdown with its lack of structure. The characters aren’t well sketched out, and with the exception of Maggie, we know nothing about anyone else. Too much print space is spent on Robbie and Jason, but without any real character development. The mystery of Maggie’s past, the story behind the books and their author Monroe Kitchener are all rushed through. All-in-all, an excellent story line that lacked in presentation. Recommended as a one-time read, but a better writer could have made this book a lot more memorable.

My rating – 2.5/5

Books For Every Occasion

“Yoga is like music: the rhythm of the body, the melody of the mind, and the harmony of the soul create the symphony of life.”
~B.K.S. Iyengar

Recommending two books on the occasions of International Yoga Day and World Music Day.
The Goddess Pose” is a biography of Indra Devi – the woman who brought Yoga to the West in the early twentieth century, from where the practice rose to the global phenomenon it continues to be. 
In “Master on Masters“, veteran musician and sarod maestro Amjad Ali Khan writes about the lives of some of the greatest icons of Indian classical music, having known many of the stalwarts personally – all eminent musicians of the twentieth century.

64586528_10158614518034937_5412555406037745664_n

Have you read either of these books? Are there any other non-technical books (memoirs, biographies, stories) on these subjects you would recommend?

Birthday Bookathon 2019

Halfway through the ‘Birthday Bookathon’. As part of the yearly goals I set on my birthday each year, my reading goal for this year was world literature in translation – an ode to translators, without whom many of the books we read would not be accessible to us unless we knew every single language in the world. I have selected languages from each letter of the English alphabet, and the aim is to read one book (at least) from each of the languages corresponding to a letter. I began on the 14th of November (my birth date). Today we are at the half way mark, and these were the books finished in the past six months.

~Albanian – The Accident – Ismail Kadare
~Bangla – The Greatest Bengali Stories Ever Told – Arunava Sinha
~Cantonese – Never Grow Up – Zhu Mo
~Danish – The Last Good Man – A.J.Kazinski
~German – The Bird Is A Raven – Benjamin Lebert
~Hungarian – Iza’s Ballad – Magda Szabó
~Italian – Six Characters in Search of an Author – Luigi Pirandello
~Japanese – The Travelling Cat Chronicles – Hiro Arikawa
~Persian – The Blind Owl – Sadegh Hedayat
~Russian – The Heart of a Dog – Mikhail Bulgakov
~Swedish – The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden – Jonas Jonasson
~Turkish – Istanbul Istanbul – Burhan Sönmez

This is the original blog-post I had written on my birthday when I started the reading list. Another fourteen more languages to go. 🙂 I am trying to keep one language for each alphabet, but I also have books from more languages, which will be read as I get the time.