Sassy Spoon – Food Photography

When friends visit from out of town, it’s a wonderful time for catching up. And food can never be far from the occasion. The day was spent meeting an old friend over lunch. (I had to create a ragtag prompt in advance yesterday, since I was scheduled to be out the entire time today.) The restaurant chosen to feast at was a place called Sassy Spoon, which serves mixed cuisines – Mediterranean, European, Asian. I had heard good reviews of the place that is known for its decor, food presentation, and courteous staff. Sharing a few pictures to feast your eyes on.

We started off with the beverages – a Fizzy Meloni – muddled fresh watermelon, with basil, lime and fizz, and Very Berry Khata comprising mulberries, orange, pomegranate and grape with kala khatta (jamun/jambolan syrup).

IMG-20180912-WA0007

Starters comprised garlic bread with cheese.

IMG-20180912-WA0016

From here we proceeded to the main course – grilled chicken in their house soaked BBQ sauce, grilled veggies and mashed potatoes.

20180912_181611

This was followed by dessert – a signature dessert titled “Seven textured hazelnut and chocolate”, comprising numerous layers of brownies, chocolate chips, mousse, and both solidified and dripping chocolate.

IMG-20180912-WA0015

All in all, a very enjoyable meal in one of the sassiest places around. The decor and ambiance are fabulous, with the rustic lighting adding a homely touch. Having visited during lunch hours, the place was packed, but never noisy.

lighting
The sedate lighting.
decor
The wall covered with these trunk prints, providing a very old school vibe.
door
A close-up of the wall featured above. See that palm print? It signifies a door that leads to the restroom. But the door is so ingeniously hidden in the wall.
Advertisements

Tea Tales

The current stack of books to grace my to-be-read shelf for the literary days ahead, with some green tea-cinnamon-orange blend for company.

books

A Brewing Obsession

Coffee should be black as hell, strong as death, and sweet as love” , goes a Turkish proverb. Coffee is one of my favorite beverages, consumed in different forms on the basis of where I am, what I’m doing, my mood at that particular time, if I’m eating anything along with it, or consuming it by itself. My friends and family know this too and frequently pick up coffee for me from their travels. Presently, I alternate between three types of coffee that were gifted to me at different times, from different places. Being the only coffee drinker at home, my stash is never-ending, for the time being at least.

The first variety is a Lebanese coffee a friend travelling from Lebanon had presented some months ago. (Those following this site since a while might remember the blog-post I had put up at the time.) Lebanese coffee, known as kahweh, is black, strong, and takes a while getting used to. The Arabic word for coffee, qahwa, is a shortened version of the phrase “qahwat al-bun” which means “wine of the bean” . It is also referred to as Turkish coffee, and is identical to the coffee available in the neighboring countries of the Middle East. It is derived from the Arabica bean, known as the Brazilian bean. Lebanon does not grow coffee beans; its coffee is imported from Nicaragua, Brazil and Sumatra. Coffee is served in Lebanon throughout the day, and is a sign of welcome when guests visit home. Lebanese coffee is usually prepared with a teaspoon of ground coffee, half a teaspoon of sugar, and a pinch of cardamom with a cup of water. The particular coffee grinds my friend had picked up were a blend of coffee and cardamom.

20171228_145004

20171228_175107
The coffee is traditionally served in tiny cups. He got me the cups as well as the pot, along with the coffee.

The second type of coffee I have here is Dormans Coffee, brought by a friend visiting from Nairobi. Dormans is a premiere coffee trading company based in Kenya. The coffee is grown organically, processed, and blended, and is derived from pure Kenya Arabica beans – harvested from cooperative farms across east Africa. I didn’t take a picture of the pack, but it came as a box comprising individual sachets of 2 grams each. (Something like the image below.) Again, a very strong coffee – I had to use one sachet for a large mug to dilute it.

61oIh1rFmUL._SX385_

The third variation of coffee available at home is Coorgi Coffee, picked up by a friend visiting the rural district of Coorg or Kodagu in the state of Karnataka in South India. The coffee is grown in high altitudes, having originated among the Chandagiri hills of Chikmagalur district. Coorgi coffee is said to be one of the best “mild coffees” in the world, on account of being grown in the shade – resulting in a coffee with a low acidic content, and carrying with it a tropical full-bodied taste and aroma. The mountainous region of Coorg blends both Arabica and Robusta beans, grown in the shades of the Rose Wood, Wild Fig and Jackfruit trees. The person who brought me this, sourced it from one of the coffee grinding mills itself. So, they packed and sealed freshly ground roasted coffee. Again, I didn’t click a picture – there was not much to document; having been procured from the source, the pack did not have any branding yet. It looked something like the image here.

media-coorgshoppe-com-images-products-1167-20120822082444-500x500

I usually drink my coffee black. The Dormans variety is an instant mix, so if I’m in a rush I make it with milk occasionally. The Coorgi coffee is relatively mild and tastes good when prepared with milk and chilled. But the grind needs time to brew. The Lebanese variant takes the longest time to prepare, since traditionally brewed coffee in Lebanon is made by boiling the coffee with water three times – till the sediment settles at the bottom of the pot, and brown froth is visible on the top. I drink this one hot and black due to the coffee-cardamom blend.

Any more coffee lovers here? The weekend is near. Time to prepare a brew and settle down with a good book. 🙂

Serious-Coffee

Blogging Anniversary

This blog-site completes a year today. Woohoo!! Those of you who have been following this site for a while, would be aware that Curious Cat was the outcome of an accident I had last year. For the uninitiated, I suffered from nerve damage and was bedridden for a couple of months – the entire right leg being paralyzed from hip to foot. Being a marathoner and dancer, staying put was more difficult than the actual injury. Books, movies, art and craft, online courses came to the rescue. I did a couple of random courses on Coursera, and began learning Russian on Duolingo. Along with painting, paper quilling and various other home-made crafts, I was aching to create something more. There was too much information input and not as much energy output. I decided to start a blog to write about things I was doing – thoughts on books I read, experiences on races I had run and dance shows I had performed at; just idle ramblings on whatever came to mind.

Curious Cat was named after my pet cats, who are always interested in what’s going on. And having spent much time with all my pets during the recovery period, I noticed how snoopy cats can be – in contrast to the indifference they are usually known for. This blog was not intended to be read by anyone; just a means of putting my thoughts into words. The settings were initially set to private because I didn’t think anyone would want to read any of it. Unlike a travel blog which would interest travellers, or a fitness site that would bring in exercise enthusiasts, or cookery or book blogs which cater to specific reader groups, I have varied interests. I love all of those things and write about all of them, and much more, and that was where the dilemma lay – in finding like-minded people who also share varied interests. About two months after I started Curious Cat, two friends found out about it from a casual conversation and wanted to read. So I had to change the private settings to public. Within a few days, a large number of “followers” cropped up. I had no idea what they were “following” because my “about” section clearly mentions my ramblings, without offering anything specific to follow.

The initial write-ups centered around book reviews and art work since I was reading a lot and crafting some thing or the other at the time. I’m not from a writing background professionally and didn’t know what to write on, besides the topics that randomly came to mind. When I turned the settings public, I also chanced upon The Daily Post and the word-of-the-day they offered bloggers to write on. November and December were spent diligently writing to every word – I didn’t miss a day! I learnt new words, and expanded and expressed on the ones I knew. It was a great initiative for newbie writers, offering them a base from where to grow. Sadly, The Daily Post discontinued this endeavor within a few months of me finding out about them. But I did connect with some like-minded people through the daily prompts, and realized there were many like me who benefited tremendously as non-writers turned somewhat writers, who wanted to continue writing daily. Stephanie from Curious Steph was instrumental in bringing us all together, and in June this year we formed the Ragtag Community – seven of us from around the globe, working in different time zones to fix a word each day for bloggers to write on. The team presently comprises Sgeoil, Margaret from Pyrenees to Pennines, Tracy from Reflections of an Untidy Mind, Mary from Cactus Haiku, Gizzylaw from Talkin’ to Myself, and of course, Steph and me. The ragtaggers recently completed three months and are growing by leaps and bounds with fellow bloggers dropping in daily to share stories, poems, photographs, or just about anything related to their interpretation of the daily prompts. Each of us has our day to fix the prompt, and Margaret has given us today’s word – energy. (For those who would like to participate.)

About two months ago, some reader friends mentioned they found it difficult to navigate Curious Cat for book reviews and literature related articles. So I started Tomes and Tales – a purely literary venture for fellow bookworms. I love reading and there’s always lots to say and share about books and authors. So at the moment, I manage three blog-sites.

At current count, Curious Cat has 211 followers. I still don’t know what everyone’s following since this was never intended to be a technical blog. But I’m glad to have you all here. The stats show I published 389 articles in the last one year, and the blogging community has played a huge role in inspiring me to write more and connect with fellow readers, athletes, musicians and a plethora of individuals with varying interests. It is rightly said, good things can come out of the bad too. The accident and its aftermath was a horrible time for someone accustomed to moving about, but if not for that forced sedentary lifestyle I might never have ventured into the blogging sphere and met so many lovely people out here. Even a year later with all my energy returned, and easing into races and dance shows step by step, I still try keep up with writing almost every day. It has been great connecting with you all. Keep reading and sharing. 🙂

hugging_animals_24

Rasmalai – Weekend Kitchen Experiments

The weekend was busy, and a few spare moments of wanting to create something led to some sequacious cooking from readily available ingredients. Rasmalai is a dessert which finds it’s origins in the Indian subcontinent. Also known as “rossomolai” due to it’s genesis in the state of West Bengal in India, derived from the words “rosh” meaning “juice” and “molai” meaning “cream”. It can be described as a rich cheesecake without crust. It was invented by Krishna Chandra Das – a confectioner, entrepreneur, businessman, and cultural icon in the early 20th century Bengal.

The preparation consists of a mixture of curd and cream, kneaded with milk and butter, and shaped into small dough balls which are then flattened into discs. I made bite-sized discs; you can make them as small or large as you want. These discs are subsequently immersed into boiling water, the utensil is partially covered, and the discs continue to boil along with the water, for about ten minutes on medium heat. A point to be noted here is that the discs swell in water, so place them at a fair distance from each other. I had dipped them too close, and an attempt to shift them while they were inside resulted in some of them cracking and crumbling.

A sugar syrup is prepared simultaneously as the water boils. I used 200 grams of sugar with 200 ml of water, suitable for about 200 grams of the dough I had started with in the beginning. Once the sugar dissolves, the discs are transferred from the water into the sugar syrup, and left to soak for about five minutes. Make sure the syrup isn’t too thick, or the discs won’t soak in the milk from the steps that follow. Transfer them gently with a huge spoon, as they are quite delicate and can crumble easily. There is an alternate method of boiling the discs directly in sugar syrup, but I didn’t want them overly sweetened with all the extra syrup soaked in, so I preferred the method of cooking in boiling water and then soaking in the syrup for a little while.

In addition to the water and sugar syrup, about half a liter of milk is boiled simultaneously as well, with sugar, finely chopped almonds and pistachios, and ground cardamon and a few strands of saffron. Stir constantly till the milk thickens, the sugar dissolves and all the ingredients are mixed properly. The discs that are removed from the sugar syrup are placed in a bowl (or two, depending on how many you have), and the milk mix (called the “ras“) is poured on top of the discs (the “malai“). This can be served warm or chilled.

1
The dough balls flattened into discs. My quantity of about 200 grams of dough gave me thirteen bite-sized discs.
2
Immersed into boiling water. Make sure to place the discs apart from each other, since they swell in the water and crack open if you attempt to move them while they’re in.
3
The milk mixture or the “ras”.
4
The discs removed from the sugar syrup. Be gentle while transferring them into a bowl or they can crack open.
5
The “ras” poured on top of the “malai”. The discs gradually soak in the milk-mix, so leave them in for a while before rushing to devour them.

A yummy Sunday treat that is almost melt-in-the-mouth. You can regulate the sugar content in the syrup and the milk mixture, to avoid making it too sweet. I preferred adding more nuts and seasoning for stronger flavors.

Happy weekend all! 🙂

Kitchen Experiments – Basbousa

Some extra time on this week day evening had me tinkering around the kitchen, looking for something to try out from what was available in the house. I remembered a recipe I had read some days ago, of the traditional Middle Eastern sweet cake known as Basbousa. The cake has various regional and dialect names – basbusah in Arabic, shamali in Armenian, revani in Turkish, gabelouze in French. Nammoura in Lebanon, hareesa in Jordan, pastusha in Kuwait. It is popular in the cuisines of the Middle East, the Balkans, and the Horn of Africa, and is primarily composed of semolina or milled wheat, soaked in sugar syrup. All the required ingredients readily available at home, I decided to have a go in trying it out.

I used semolina and desiccated coconut, to which yogurt and butter were added along with lemon juice, rose water, and baking powder. The entire mixture was filled into a baking tray, and baked for about twenty minutes at 160° Celsius. On cooling for a little while post baking, hot sugar syrup was poured on the warm cake. I cut the cake first, giving the syrup space to soak into each piece. Alternately, one can also poke holes with a knitting needle for the syrup to soak in completely. Garnishing is optional – I used an almond for each piece.

For those without a sweet tooth, this recipe is not very sweet and fun to try out. I used homemade yogurt which was unsweetened and made from low-fat milk. The desiccated coconut was also unsweetened. Remember, you can avoid the sugar syrup topping if you want – the cake is soft enough due to the yogurt. It makes for a healthy and filling snack.

1
All ingredients mixed together, except for the sugar syrup.
2
Out from the oven and left to cool.
3
Pieces cut before pouring the syrup, ensuring it soaks in completely.
4
Optional garnishing. You can also use chopped walnuts or pistachios or flaxseed powder.

If you like trying cuisines from around the world, have a go at this and let me know how it turns out.

When Your Mouth Isn’t Doing The Talking…

Danny Danziger and Mark McCrum came out with a book in 2009 titled “The Whatchamacallit” – a fun and witty compilation of “everyday objects you just can’t name, and things you think you know about but don’t. ”  According to the author duo, the beginning of wisdom is to call things by their right names. In continuation with our effort to add to one’s ever expanding vocabulary in the Ragtag Daily Prompt, MNL from Cactus Haiku has prompted us with borborygmus as the word for the day.

Borborygmus can be described as a stomach rumble or peristaltic sound, also referred to as ‘bubble gut‘ due to the rumbling, growling or gurgling noises produced by the movement of the contents of the gastrointestinal tract as they are propelled through the small intestine by a series of muscle contractions known as ‘peristalsis‘. The rumbles and grumbles are produced in the stomach as fluid and gas move forward in the intestines. The scientific name ‘borborygmus‘ is derived from the 16th century French word ‘borborygme‘, which in turn was related to the ancient Greek  βορβορυγμός (borborygmós – which the Greeks coined onomatopoetically).

969724_646220925392871_349318101_n

Incomplete digestion of food can lead to excess gas in the intestine. Hunger can also trigger peristalsis through the ‘migrating motor complex‘. After the stomach has emptied, it signals the brain to restart peristalsis via the digestive muscles. The rumblings can also be caused when air is swallowed if one is sipping beverages through a straw, or constantly talking while eating.

gut-instinct

As a marathon runner, borborygmus is something we often deal with. The medical terminology makes it sound a lot more threatening than it actually is, but something as innocuous as sipping an energy drink through the straw of a tetrapack while in the middle of a run can trigger fluid and gas movement, creating rumbles. If one’s meals and races or training sessions are not timed properly, it can cause discomfort while running. An athlete is often advised to not try anything new on race day – whether the pre-race meals, energy aids during the race, or nutrient replacements post the event, one should consume foods the digestive system is accustomed to. Any sort of experimentation can be left for training days.

mouse-cartoon360

A variation of the word has been found in literature, used to describe noise in general. ‘Borborygmic’ featured in Vladimir Nabokov’s “Ada” where noisy plumbing was referred to as “waterpipes seized with borborygmic convulsions”. In “A Long way Down” Elizabeth Fenwick described a room as being “very quiet, except for it’s borborygmic old radiator”. Graham Greene’s “Alas, Poor Maling” was a short story featuring a character who found “irritating noises taking the shape of borborygmus”.

205ce43c-bdf6-4fb8-b5b7-5a867bcdcdd6

Have you ever wondered what your body is trying to communicate with you? Maybe you will pay closer attention to all those creaks and groans from now on. Aside of the noises inside, do you think you could identify some borborygmic sounds in the vicinity? Now you know the word for them!

Weekend Kitchen Experiments – Handvo

Weekends are a time for trying out new recipes and experimenting in the kitchen. I love baking and usually tinker with sweet dishes, but had some extra time on hand yesterday and tried out this savory preparation for breakfast.

Handvo is a vegetable cake originating from Western India – a part of the cuisine specific to the state of Gujarat. It is often made with bottle gourd, though other vegetables can also be used as filling. The commonly used ingredients are wheat flour or rice, a mixture of lentils, bottle gourd and/or other vegetables and sesame seeds, making this a wholesome meal to enjoy by itself or with a side of pickle or chutney.

There are four parts to the ingredients – the dough, the vegetables, the tempering, and the garnishing. For the dough, rice and gram were soaked the previous day for a few hours, ground, and then left to ferment overnight with yogurt. Bottle gourd, carrots and ginger were peeled and grated, fenugreek leaves were finely chopped, and green chillies were crushed. A tempering was made by heating oil, adding mustard seeds and turning off the heat once they started spluttering. Sesame seeds and dried red chillies were added, followed by all the remaining ingredients assembled earlier. The medley of food components were mixed well.

With an oven pre-heated and a baking pan greased, baking soda needs to be added just before you are ready to pour the batter into the pan. Sesame seeds were sprinkled on top and the mixture was baked for about half an hour. (The top needs to turn crispy brown – baking could take anywhere between twenty-five to forty-five minutes.) It was left to cool for about twenty minutes before removing from the pan. I sprinkled chopped coriander leaves on top before serving. Additional sesame seeds or flaxseed powder can be added to the garnish, if desired.

Handvo is usually prepared and served as a cake. I baked the mixture in two sets, resulting in two “flattened cakes” instead of one thick one. It does not affect the taste – I just wanted to start eating while the second lot was still in the oven, and the flatter version baked faster. And this is a very nutritious meal – with it’s assortment of grains, seeds and vegetables, and the fact that it is baked. Minimal oil is used for the tempering.

1
The “flat cake” since I divided the mixture into two sets for baking.
2
Garnished with coriander leaves.
3
All set for a healthy breakfast.

Considering the time required for soaking and fermenting the grains, and baking the entire mixture, this is a longish meal preparation. The ingredients, however, are mixed and set aside and the dish otherwise does not take up too much of time. Give this one a go if you like trying cuisines from around the world and are looking for healthy alternatives.

Sunshine Cooking – Lemon Blondies

The sun decided to peek through the clouds after weeks of heavy rains. I decided to do some extempore cooking to celebrate the bright occasion – something that represented sunshine. These Lemon Blondies fit the criteria perfectly. (They are regular brownies, but there’s no cocoa or chocolate or walnuts or dates, so in the absence of any visible brown, they’re blondies.) Baking ingredients are always easily available at my place, and with a mixing time of barely ten minutes, along with fifteen minutes to bake and some intermittent cooling, I was all set to eat within half an hour.

The ingredients are basic – sugar, butter, flour, eggs, baking powder. I mixed 3/4 cup powdered sugar and 1/2 cup salted butter with 1 tbsp lemon juice and 1/2 a lemon’s rind. 2 eggs were then added to the mixture, followed by 3/4 cup flour and 1/2 tsp baking powder, and we were all set to enter the oven.

LB1

Glaze was prepared with 3/4 cup icing sugar, 1 and 1/2  tbsp lemon juice and 1/2 a lemon’s rind, and a pinch of yellow food coloring. The cake was cooled for about ten minutes once out of the oven. Icing was applied and left to dry completely.

LB2

In a few minutes, we were all set to eat the extempore sunshine treat.

Lemon Blondies

The crunchy frosting perfectly contrasts the softness of the blondie, just as the sourness of the lemon juice and rind balances out the sweetness of the sugar. A delectable snack that almost melts in the mouth. Try it out if you can – it’s easy and quick to prepare.

 

Pingback for ragtag daily prompt:

https://ragtagcommunity.wordpress.com/2018/07/18/rdp-48-extempore/