Run The World #5 – Moire O’Sullivan

Moire O’Sullivan is a mountain runner and adventure racer. The Irish runner is a regular podium finisher at adventure races all around Ireland, such as Quest Killarney, Quest Glendalough, Dingle Adventure Race, Gaelforce West, and Westport Sea2Summit. She was the first person to complete the Wicklow Round within twenty-four hours, an endurance run spanning a hundred kilometres over twenty-six of Ireland’s remotest mountain peaks. Adventure Racing (or Expedition Racing) is a multi-disciplinary sport involving running, cycling and kayaking, navigated over an unmarked wilderness course, spanning anywhere between hours to weeks in length. Moire not only competes and wins, but beats the men along the way.

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Running through the forests in the Wicklow Mountains during the Quest Glendalough Adventure Race 2017.

Moire O’Sullivan was born in 1976 in Derry. As a child, she was interested in science. She played netball until the age of eighteen, when she quit to focus on the viola, and consequently played in the Ulster Youth Orchestra. She has a BSc in Chemistry and an MA in Administration and Management. After university, she worked for missionaries in Kenya. Having spent seven years in Africa, she returned to Ireland and took up mountain running.

In July 2008, Moire made a solo attempt on the Wicklow Round. After twenty one and a half hours she collapsed, two summits from the end. Battered and bruised, yet undeterred, she returned a year later to become the first person ever to complete the Round in less than twenty four hours. Her passion for mountain running that took her from the heights of some of Ireland’s most impressive mountains to the depths of her own human limitations, is chronicled in the 2011 book “Mud, Sweat, and Tears”.

In 2018, she completed the Denis Rankin Round, a challenge to summit all the peaks in the Mourne Mountains over 400m in height within a 24 hour period. She also won Ireland’s National Adventure Racing Series in 2014, 2016 and 2017.

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Quest Killarney 2016
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Mourne Mountains 2017

Moire makes it seem like a breeze, but the years 2014 and 2016 are particularly remarkable because she not only had two children in 2013 and 2015, but also won the National Adventure Race series both times. In fact, Moire had even raced the twenty-four hour Northern Ireland’s Sperrin Mountains when she had not yet discovered she was pregnant at the time. Olympic medallist Sonia O’Sullivan credits Moire for her insights into the challenges of bringing children into the world while continuing to live the life of a top level athlete – a true inspiration for mums who run. Champion hill racer Jasmin Paris refers to Moire’s 2014 and 2016 feats as a winning journey through motherhood and mountains. Surprisingly, it was motherhood that got the formerly mountain runner into adventure racing.

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Running down Strickeen Mountain at Killarney 2014

I was pregnant with my first child, and feeling tired and fat. I was so depressed that I couldn’t race in my current condition that I started to flick through my phone to see what my mountain running friends were up to. They were biking through the Gap of Dunloe, kayaking around Muckross Lake, running up and down Mangerton Mountain. That’s what I wanted to do!

 

Coming from a running background, Moire learned how to ride a bike outdoors, how to use indoor rollers; hiring a coach to train her for this new discipline while also taking her pregnancy into account. On apprehensions of a first time mum about how fellow athletes would feel having a pregnant woman in their midst, Moire shares “Post my third trimester, I decided to join a local cycling club. Scared they might prevent me from riding, I concealed my pregnancy from them. It was only when my belly started to bulge from beneath my biking jacket that I had to eventually come clean“. Her first tryst with adventure racing was the Killarney Adventure Race, the same videos and pictures she had seen of her friends.

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Biking leg of Killarney 2014

On a  mothers’s bond with her child, Moire reveals, “During the fifth month, I competed in an adventure race that involved biking, mountain running and kayaking across the Inishowen Peninsula, in North-West Ireland.  Running off the summit of Slieve Snacht, half-way through the course, I got the mother of all stitches. I knew there was nothing I could do except descend the mountain and seek emergency medical help. When I reached the mountain’s base, the pain had somehow dissipated, so I ran straight past the medics. I continued on and completed the course after five hours of racing. It was only after crossing the finish line that my baby delivered the mother of all kicks. It was his way of communicating that he had no further interest in racing“.

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With newborn Aran

When her elder son Aran was four months old, Moire entered the Sea2Summit adventure race that involved running and biking around a remote mountainous area in the west of Ireland, carting her husband and baby down to Westport, with a car full of baby gear. She finished the race in third place. When Aran was twelve months old, she ran the 66 km Gaelforce West.

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Westport Sea2Summit

The 2018 book “Bump, Bike & Baby” chronicles her personal journey of these two years – learning about motherhood, and bringing up two children while simultaneously training for, and subsequently winning a series of races. Moire shares an honest account of her apprehensions of becoming pregnant while at the top of her sport, her experiences as a new mom in 2013, the quest to find other mum-athletes who could teach her a thing or two, getting back to training with a toddler, and repeating it all over again in 2015, striking a balance between her children and the sport she loves. As Moire describes it – a journey from carefree mountain runner to responsible mother of two, to unbeatable athlete.

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Quest Glendalough 2016 podium, with 9-month old Cahal

“You can get back to racing and training. It’s a struggle, but you can.”

Moire cites her inspiration as track cyclist Susie Mitchell, who trained through her own pregnancy, and four months after giving birth won a World Masters track title. She also credits her coaches who guided her appropriately through walking and swimming during the latter months of pregnancy, with proper race training post delivery. “No one can fully prepare you for the seismic shift your life takes once you have a baby. You are totally responsible for making sure they are safe, clean, and fed. Before children, I could go for a day-long run in the mountains if I wanted to. With a baby around, one that I was breastfeeding exclusively, military precision timing was necessary for me to leave the house for even an hour.” Moire stresses on the importance of using time efficiently. “Every training session had a specific focus; whether it was strength and conditioning, or power sessions on the bike, or time spent rowing in the gym“.

Irish marathoner Padraig O’Connor describes Moire as a phenomenal athlete who passes friendly words of advice or encouragement to fellow runners, before she flies off, leaving mere mortals in her dust. What pushes an athlete at the peak of their game? What frightens them? “The fact that I was abandoning my baby to go and train continually plagued me with guilt. How could I be so selfish, taking time out for myself? But returning from these training sessions, I knew it was the right thing to do. Not only was I getting my body back into shape, but training was also reminding me who I was as a person, before I took on this additional role as a mother“. Whether one is involved in sports or not, races competitively or recreationally, Moire’s journey is inspiring. We all belong to different tribes, but Moire teaches us how to strike a balance with different identities, combining life, family and sport.

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Bikes and babies

“I love it when new mothers say, ‘you helped me to think through how to be me.’”

Moire previously worked for international aid agencies throughout Africa and South-East Asia. Her job took her around the world, enabling her to run in Australia, Bali, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Hong Kong, Kenya, Laos, Myanmar / Burma, Nepal, New Zealand, Spain, Singapore, South Korea, Tanzania, Thailand, USA, and Vietnam. She had tried to run in Afghanistan, but was forbidden by security staff. She now lives in Rostrevor, Northern Ireland, at the foot of the Mourne Mountains, and runs her own company “Happy out Adventures“, that aims to bring people to experience and enjoy trails and mountain slopes, while teaching them how to travel outdoors and respect nature.

Her hope is that her journey encourages women to keep fit – before, during, and after kids. “If you’re lacking inspiration, go for a run!”

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Sources:

~www.moireosullivan.com

~www.lessonsinbadassery.com

~www.gaelforceevents.com

~www.questadventureseries.com