The Monsoon Murders – Book Review

Title – The Monsoon Murders

Author – Karan Parmanandka

Genre – Fiction, mystery, thriller

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A quick analysis of a quick read that bodes well on a rainy evening or if you have few hours to spare on an idle weekend. “The Monsoon Murders” is a murder mystery set in Mumbai city that keeps the reader on edge at every one of it’s two hundred pages. Debut writer Parmanandka cuts right to the chase – a high profile murder in a plush housing society in Powai, the victim is killed in his own house with no witnesses, and no visible signs of breaking in or attempts of struggle. A detective hired by the company where the victim was employed feels he is being used as a pawn in the entire game, as he coddiwomples through his investigations. Friends, relatives, colleagues – who is to be trusted? Accusations keep flying, the corpse count increases along with the incessant Mumbai rains. Are the numerous monsoon murders linked to each other or just random casualties?

The fast-paced mystery that keeps you guessing till the last page is said to be inspired from real life cases and meticulously researched forensic investigations. Newbie writer Parmanandka has done a commendable job in this well presented crime thriller. Neither filled with fanciful jargon nor comprising mediocre writing, he strikes the perfect balance in his narrative. The clichéd romantic angle between the investigating officer and the prime suspect caused me to conjecture the book wouldn’t live up to it’s brilliant start, but Parmanandka surprised me by spinning around his narrative every step of the way. The writing is simple but the storyline is unpredictable and it keeps you hooked. I finished the book in a few hours. Not a literary marvel if language development or vocabulary improvement is what one looks for while reading. No philosophical quotes to share, and the cover appears a trifle cheesy too. I would recommend this to anyone looking for a quick read or an edge-of-the-seat thriller, or if you devour the genre of crime fiction.  This is one of the few one-time reads I would give an all star rating. The only glitch was some loopholes I felt were not answered – either the author overlooked certain parts or expected to keep the reader guessing even after the book ended. I would look forward to reading more from Karan Parmanandka post his supremely impressive debut.

I read this on Kindle and it is available on KU (Kindle Unlimited) for e-book users who would like to read it.

My rating – 4/5

MM

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Pictures Over Words

Happy World Photography Day!

Let me be reticent with my writings and let the picture say it all today.

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Jaded July – Monthly Literary Analysis

July came to a not-so-jolly end as far as reading goals were concerned. The monsoon brought with it incessant rains and a host of germs in the air. I was unwell for a fair bit, and hardly got in much book time during the first fortnight. The month culminated with six books and two short stories – an equal mix of fiction and non-fiction books. Here’s what I read last month. The numbers are not much, but I did get in some great quality literature. I still haven’t managed to write reviews for all of them, and will get down to it shortly.

1) Journey To The Sea – Sarah Brown

https://curiouscat99.wordpress.com/2018/07/10/journey-to-the-sea-book-review/

2) Silence – Thich Nhat Hanh

https://curiouscat99.wordpress.com/2018/07/15/silence-book-review/

3) Mike & Psmith – P.G.Wodehouse

https://curiouscat99.wordpress.com/2018/07/21/mike-and-psmith-book-review/

4) Beautiful – Katie Piper (Review coming up)

5) Under The Jaguar Sun – Italo Calvino

https://curiouscat99.wordpress.com/2018/07/26/under-the-jaguar-sun-book-review/

6) Warm Bodies – Isaac Marion (Review coming up)

 

Short stories from Jeffrey Archer

1) The Grass Is Always Greener (Review coming up)

2) A Wasted Hour

https://curiouscat99.wordpress.com/2018/07/28/short-story-review-a-wasted-hour/

 

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