2020 – Books Read In January

January done well! 📚💪

It’s a good day when you can retire with a book at the end of it. And it’s a literary achievement for a reader when all those good books accumulate and the year kicks off to a great start. There’s no time to waste on mediocre books, and there’s truly a sense of satisfaction when all the books you read turn out to be gems.

A summary of books read this month:
5 paperbacks:
~The Wall by Jurek Becker – A collection of stories by a survivor of the Holocaust, using his memories at the concentration camps to weave out stories. 4/5
~Bombay Balchao by Jane Borges – A novel about the Goan, Mangalorean and East Indian Catholics in Bombay, travelling from the 1930s to the present day. 5/5
~Silent Was Zarathustra by Nicolas Wild – A graphic novel cum biography of the humanist Cyrus Yazdani, along with a history of Zoroastrianism. 4/5
~India’s Most Haunted by K. Hari Kumar – Essays of haunted places, superstitions, rumours, folktakes from around the country. 4/5
~Tödlicher Schnee by Felix & Theo – A crime novel about a private detective on holiday at a ski resort, who inadvertently gets pulled into a series of murders at a global environmental conference. 4/5

3 books read on kindle:
~The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky – A novel about a teenager living life on the sidelines; ‘watching instead of participating’ in life. 5/5
~Zorgamazoo by Robert Paul Weston – A verse novel about a duo of misfits trying to save the world from boredom. 5/5
~Booked by Kwame Alexander – Another verse novel about sport and books. Enough said! 4/5

jan

Books. Words. Life.

For all you bookworms who love the feel and smell of “real” books, and have never been able to or felt the need for switching to e-readers or tablets, today is your day. It’s Paperback Book Day!

E-readers carry a whole lot of more material in a smaller device, are convenient to lug around, and take up less physical space than paperbacks. But there is something “real” about physical books that makes some of us hold on to them even in this age of technological advancement.

Paperback Book Day is celebrated on 30th July because it is the anniversary of the day the first Penguin paperbacks were published in England in 1935. The day revolutionized reading when it was introduced. Prior to the availability of paperbacks, the hardcover book was considered the only way to read “good literature”. But they were expensive (like many of them still are), most people could not afford to buy the books, and being big and bulky they were not easy to carry around and read. The paperbacks existing prior to 1935 were cheap in price but also of poor quality – in terms of both writing and printing. “Books of substance” were not published in paperback form.

Sir Allen Lane realized that the reading material available to the average person was mostly low quality and unacceptable. He started what would become Penguin books in an attempt to make good quality literature available more easily and inexpensively. Ernest Hemingway and Agatha Christie were among the first authors whose titles were published under Penguin.

In America, Robery Fair de Graff had a similar epiphany, and decided that books should not only be cheap but small enough to carry around and be read anywhere. This venture resulted into the launch of Pocket Books in 1939. Emily Brontë, Agatha Christie and Shakespeare were some of the authors whose titles were sold by Pocket Books in the early days.

Both Penguin and Pocket Books still publish today in an era of ebooks, and bookstores still sell paperbacks even in the presence of numerous online portals. I have many fiction books on the Kindle, which are mostly one time reads or books I do not want taking up space on the bookshelves. Most of my non-fiction, academic and technical books are in the form of paperbacks.

Readers look for any excuse to read. How better to celebrate Paperback Book Day than to sit back, relax and read a book.

15 Jan 2018 (12)